Learning Management System 101: How Companies Are Transforming Corporate and Safety Training in the Workplace

A Learning Management System (also called an LMS) is a software platform that aids the delivery, measurement, and management of an organisation’s corporate e-learning programs. An LMS has become an incredibly powerful tool for the improvement and retention of an organisation’s workforce.

Supporting learning as it happens is the most significant function of any learning management system. For example, LMS makes it easy that new employees can be automatically assigned to e-learning onboarding course, track their progress, and evaluate their level of information retention.

Nonetheless, Beakon’s leaning management system goes beyond basic LMS functionality by incorporating social learning features that allow clients to consult peer mentors, ask questions, collaborate, encourage and reward content contribution.

Companies use learning management system as the foundation of their corporate training programs, which mostly are cloud-based software solutions. The ever-evolving leaner needs have helped with the new advancements in learning technology which revolutionised online learning by allowing increased and improved data collection activities that are enabling mobile learning and revenue generation.

What is an LMS Used For?

Learning management systems are used to centralise, deploy, and measure organisational training activities.

Some internal and external corporate use cases are supported by the use of a learning management system supports, these include:

  • Employee Training: The most common use case of LMS is to support the training and development of internal employees. Courses can be assigned within the LMS to ensure employees acquire the right job skills, informed about product changes, and are up-to-date on compliance training.
  • Customer Training: Another everyday use case of LMS is for companies to deliver training to customers. Usually, it is commonly used by software and technology companies who need to effectively onboard users so they can use their product effectively. Also, ongoing customer training provides more value to customers and prevent customer churn.
  • Safety Training: An organisations could need to keep its workers and contractors updated with the latest best practices when it comes to safety training. Needless to say, compliance with Workplace Health and Safety guidelines is essential.

Advantages of an LMS

Business and learners can derive benefits and advantages when implementing an LMS:

Benefits for Businesses

An LMS can help enterprises to:

  1. It decreased learning and development costs
  2. Trim down training/onboarding time for employees, customers, and partners
  3. Enabling environment for multiple learning audiences
  4. Centralise e-learning resources
  5. Friendly user interface for re-use of learning materials over time
  6. Maintain compliance
  7. Track learner progress
  8. Aid onboard partners and resellers to enhance their ability to sell
  9. Retained customers by ensuring effective use of products and services
  10. Measure how learning impacts organisational performance

Benefits for Learners:

An LMS can help learners:

  1. Increase knowledge retention
  2. Stay on top of required training
  3. Exposure to formal and informal learning best practices
  4. Acquire the knowledge and skills needed for career development
  5. Improve performance

Conclusion

Beakon’s LMS can quickly (and quickly) help your company take advantage of the benefits outlined above. And as you already know, there are several use-cases for our software: employee or contractor onboarding, safety training, on-site induction, etc.

To see how Beakon can help you transform your company, take advantage of our no-strings-attached FREE trial today.

How To Guide: Using A Learning Management System To Onboard New Employees

Gone are the days when employees are expected to start and end their careers in a particular company. With the increasing trend of freelancing and lifestyle business options gaining ground among most millennials, statistics reveal that new employees base their decision about staying in a company for the long-term on the first six months, with about one-third leaving for a better opportunity within that timeframe.

As a result, companies no longer have the luxury (or leisure) of offering on-the-job training for new employees. Companies want their employees to hit the ground running and be as productive as possible from the get-go. This is even more important in industries that hire seasonally such as hospitality, manufacturing, and sales.

The best way, therefore, to help new hires hit the ground running is to offer a systemized onboarding process that indoctrinates them into the company culture while familiarising them with the procedures needed to carry out their job duties with utmost efficiency. This can be done by using a learning management system or LMS to create an induction training that will arm new employees with everything they need to be fully functional after their first week on the job.

Benefits of Using a Learning Management System for Employee Onboarding

Before the explosion of online courses and learning management systems, either the Human Resource manager or some other senior ranking executive in the company usually did onboarding for new hires. This was essential because factors like company culture, compliance and safety protocols and organisational procedures could not be left to any junior staff.

These days, however, new employees can get up to speed in less than a week with the help of a learning management system. Implementing one of these systems into your organisation opens your company up to a myriad of benefits, including:

  • Reducing Training Costs: One of the key benefits of an LMS is the fact that it cuts down the costs (and time) of training new employees significantly. So, instead of investing time and resources to train new employees, they can log in to your LMS system on any device and start their onboarding process.
  • Boosting Employee Performance: Another key benefit of implementing an LMS in your company, as mentioned in the previous section, is the ability to enable employees to become more efficient without the need for face-to-face training.
  • Ensures And Accelerates Compliance Training: Onboarding new employees more often than not has to do with ensuring that compliance with the organisation’s goals, mission and vision are imparted as quickly as possible. An LMS accelerates this process for recruits.
  • Cuts Down The Need For Direct Training From Senior Staff: While spending time with your organisation’s top-level executives are a morale-booster for new employees, it dramatically reduces the productivity of said executive and could directly impact the company’s bottom line. Leveraging a learning management system to automate this process provides a win-win situation that leaves everyone happy.

It is essential for your company to indoctrinate new employees into your organisation as quickly as possible. The most effective and scalable way to do that is by implementing a learning management system that will walk new hires through your company’s most important values and processes. This not only increases your employee retention rate but also ensures that your new hires can hit the ground running and be more productive.

 

Important updates from Beakon – November 2017

Beakon continues to evolve to benefit customers new and old. Below we’ve rounded up some of the latest information and updates related to the software.

Software updates

Permit to work

Our modules aim to cover all areas of governance, risk and compliance and we’re always looking to extend the ways we can help you. We now offer an updated Permit to Work module, thanks to modifications made on behalf of Santos oil and gas. Our Permit to Work software can be used alongside our other risk management modules, or on its own.

This module works on all devices, including tablets and smartphones, and helps you to:

  • Issue Permits to Work
  • Complete permit approvals
  • View audit-friendly permit history and access history records

Asset register

Our Asset Register module, which we originally developed for University of Technology (UTS), is now available. This valuable tool helps you maintain a list of the status and value of all fixed assets within your organisation.

A regularly updated electronic asset register will make sure you’re able to instantly view the information you need, from level of depreciation to its current location, whenever you need it. Talk to us today to find out how your organisation can benefit.

Visitor kiosk capability

Businesses used to rely on signing in books to track who visited site, but visitor kiosks, available as part of our Visitor Management module, offer an easy and far more reliable way to keep track of who’s been on site.

Touchscreen visitor kiosks can be installed wherever you need them and, when used with our Visitor Management software, can help ensure you stay in control of access to your premises.

With our Visitor Management software you can:

  • Automate access permissions and provide self-service inductions
  • Log site visitors – including time of arrival and areas accessed
  • Deploy OHS and Facilities Management induction courses and documentation – and automatically adjust access authorization accordingly
  • Synchronise with Staff ID and Card machines, including those with security coding
  • Provide all necessary data for performance, compliance and OHS audits

New functionality within modules

  • It’s now possible to run a compliance report from your dashboard
  • Dashboards now have a ‘filter’ tool, making it easier for you to see the specific data you need, e.g. by department

Mobile app coming soon

We’re always looking to make life easier for our customers, which is why we’ve started work on a Beakon mobile app. This will make it even more simple to manage and improve your business safety while you’re on the move. Stay tuned for more news on the launch date and how to get the app.

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How training and orientation are crucial to keeping new workers safe

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Imagine you’re starting a new job.

You have to meet your co-workers, learn the ins and outs of the company, and begin performing your duties.

Meanwhile, you have to stay safe. This can be a challenge for new workers: Employees in their first month on the job have more than 3 times the risk for a lost-time injury than workers who have been at their job for more than a year, according to research from the Toronto-based Institute for Work & Health.

Possible reasons for this? Peter Smith, IWH scientist, points out that new workers may be performing unfamiliar tasks – some of them hazardous. In addition, the workers may be unsure about their safety rights and responsibilities, and might feel uncomfortable speaking up about a hazard.

“We can only speculate on the ‘why,’” said Curtis Breslin, another IWH scientist who has collaborated with Smith on research about new worker safety. “One thing studies have shown is that there’s a lack of familiarity. That’s a common theme that could be contributing to new workers’ increased risk. The other possibility is that new workers might be encountering more hazards. Or their risk perception – they don’t have the knowledge and awareness, so they’re underestimating the risks. It could be issues with training, maybe they’re not being trained [or receiving] on-the-job, hard-knocks-type training that happens in the first or second month.”

IWH research has found that few new workers receive safety training – 1 out of 5 among a sample of Canadian workers, according to a 2007 study.

“The fact almost 80 percent of workers who were in their first year of employment could not remember receiving any workplace safety or orientation training is worrying for a few reasons,” Smith said. “This likely results in these workers being without important knowledge that could prevent them, or one of their co-workers, [from] getting injured.”

However, according to IWH, as novice workers gain job experience, their risk declines.

Looking at the numbers

In 2013, nearly one-third of the nonfatal occupational injuries or illnesses that involved time away from work were suffered by workers with less than one year of service, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nearly one-quarter of these cases resulted in 31 or more days away from work, said Ken Kolosh, statistics manager at the National Safety Council.

Certain subgroups of new workers are at heightened injury risk. In the agriculture, forestry and fishing industry, 45.4 percent of the injuries and illnesses in 2013 occurred among workers with less than one year of experience. In the construction and extraction industry, it was 34.9 percent.

“That makes sense because a lot of those industries are cyclical; they’re seasonally employed,” Kolosh said. “Almost by definition, many of those workers are always going to be new employees. The construction industry has a lot of seasonal employment. It has a lot of contractor-type workers, so a larger proportion of that population by definition is going to have less than three months of service.”

Construction workers frequently change jobsites as well, which can present problems.

“Every day, you have to be aware of what’s going on. You have to have good communication,” said Scott Schneider, director of occupational safety and health at the Washington-based Laborers’ Health and Safety Fund of North America. “It’s less an issue on unionized sites, where people have a substantial amount of safety training in apprenticeship programs. They also, as apprentices, get mentored along the way. It’s still an issue in the sense you’re going to a different jobsite, and you may not be familiar with that jobsite.”

IWH research published in 2012 concluded that risk was higher among new workers who were older, men and workers in the “goods sector,” including construction and manufacturing. This may be because these jobs have more physical demands, and older workers might be more physically susceptible to injury, Breslin said.

Online Learning Management Systems – Which LMS format works best?

Beakon’s online learning management system (aka e-Learning system) is a simple and effective way to deliver online learning. We are often asked if our e-Learning platform is SCORM compliant; the answer is yes, but it’s easy to overlook the alternatives to SCORM formatted courses.

What Is SCORM?

The US Department of Defence developed an online learning management system in the 1990s. Not wanting to do things by half-measures, they created an advanced content management system to deliver engaging and interactive content for learning.

SCORM courses may include interactive quizzes, videos, images and slide shows; using interactive and multi-media learning makes it easier to understand and remember learning outcomes. Many e-Learning platforms are configured to deploy SCORM courses; linked to its flexibility, this often makes SCORM the format of choice for online learning management systems.

SCORM has seen several updates, SCORM 1.2 being the current version.

To SCORM or not to SCORM?

SCORM is very good for building engaging courses, but it does have some downsides that should be considered:

1) SCORM courses can be very large, making it more difficult to download over a slow internet connection.

2) SCORM doesn’t always display correctly on tablets or smartphones.

3) SCORM courses are time consuming and complex to build.

4) They’re equally time consuming to modify or change.

At Beakon, we understand how good SCORM courses can be, but appreciate that it can be quite time and cost intensive to build. For this reason, we’ve built a simple online course builder inside Beakon using a simple WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get)  system.

Beakon’s course builder can deploy videos, pdf files, images, and text quickly and simply in a lightweight format.

Many Beakon clients use a mix of SCORM courses and simple courses built inside Beakon to give flexibility and agility in building and managing courses for effective online learning.

Things to consider

When deciding on an online learning format, consider who will use the course, how often it will be changed or modified, and how much money and time you can invest in creating the course.

If you want simple and lightweight, WYSIWYG is probably best, and for more complex and engaging courses, SCORM is still the best option.

We’re great believers in giving our users diverse tools to build and deploy learning – no two organisations have exactly the same requirements, and our experience is that you know your audience better than anybody else.

Find out more

To see how a WYSIWYG content-builder works (or if you’ve any questions about which online learning management system format will best suit your requirements, contact us today!